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Should You Let the Cloud Delete Your Old Music For You?

Should You Let the Cloud Delete Your Old Music For You?

Firewires, BitTorrents, copying friends’ whole music libraries, and other music aquisition benefits of the information age have given all of us massive music libraries that would be the envy of any previous generation. Not to mention programs like Genius and Pandora, that tell us what to listen to based on what we already like.

But what if there was a program that could systematically comb your library, searching for tunes that didn’t seem to fit the rest of your music tastes. What if that program would offer you up big lists of songs — not to buy or listen to — but to delete. It’s happened to all of us before; you’re at a party, someone has their iTunes on shuffle, and then suddenly that song comes on that you never would have expected your host to still have on file, in the worst way. What if he auto-cleaned his music library once a week to avoid exactly that kind of party fowl?

In response to Ping and the sudden “push” function of many music programs on the web, Brian Whitman created a hack called The Future of Music which is an app for Mac OS X that does just that. Here’s what he had to say about it:

“If we rely on these computer programs to learn about music, well we might as well rely on them to fix the sins of our past and delete the crap we are obviously not meant to listen to anymore. “Future of Music (2010)” is a Mac OS X app that scans your iTunes library and computes the music you are not supposed to listen to anymore based on your preferences. It then helpfully deletes it from iTunes and your hard drive. Skips the recycle bin. Just like other recommender systems, it uses a lot of fancy math (and data from Echo Nest and last.fm) that really doesn’t matter in the end. Just click the button and let it take care of your life."

Are programs that recommend music making us lazy and unable to tell not only what we really like but what we really don’t like? What do you think?

[via Mad Decent]