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The Warhol Film Collection Is Going Digital

The Warhol Film Collection Is Going Digital

Images courtesy of The Warhol museum

Today, it was announced that hundreds of Andy Warhol's films—from the five-hour literal snoozefest, Sleep, to Nico/Antoine (pictured above)—will be converted to digital format in a partnership by The Warhol, The Museum of Modern Art, and MPC, the VFX studio who recently turned van Gogh still lifes into animated paintings. The project will be the largest effort to digitize the work of a single artist in MoMA's collection.

Explains a press release:

"The project will once again make accessible approximately 500 titles that Warhol made between 1963 and 1972, then withdrew from circulation more than 40 years ago. Nearly 1,000 rolls of original 16mm film will be digitally scanned, frame by frame, and converted into high resolution (2K) images. The process will begin in August and will take several years to complete as the process of scanning is delicate. However once completely digitized the entire collection of Warhol films will be available for public screening."

Marcel Duchamp and Benedetta Barzini Screen Test [ST 81] (1966)

Rejendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film at MoMA, adds that the digitization will, "allow us to maintain our custodial responsibility for the long term analog preservation of Andy Warhol's films, and will help provide broader access to them for research and theatrical exhibition.”

MPC will scan and restore all the film, so in due time, we'll all be able to watch people sleep or eat bananas in hi-res together under one roof. For more information on the project, visit The Warhol museum's website.

Kiss The Boot [Excerpt] (1966)

Related: 

Dutch Masterpiece Is Turned Into A Harry Potter-like Animated Still Life

Andy Warhol's Forgotten Floppy Disk Art Has Been Found

The Original Creators: Andy Warhol